What Were The Two Sides Of The Berlin Wall?

The ideological barriers behind the Wall

Capitalist West Berlin was aligned politically with the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany), while East Berlin served as the capital of the socialist German Democratic Republic (East Germany).

Who did West Berlin belong to?

At the end of World War II the Soviet Union took eight of Berlin’s districts as its sector of occupation. What was called the New West End, developed after old Berlin had outgrown its space, became West Berlin.

Who built the Berlin Wall East or West?

The Berlin Wall was built by the German Democratic Republic during the Cold War to prevent its population from escaping Soviet-controlled East Berlin to West Berlin, which was controlled by the major Western Allies. It divided the city of Berlin into two physically and ideologically contrasting zones.

How did the West view the Berlin Wall?

The East Germans also erected an extensive barrier along most of the 850-mile border between East and West Germany. In the West, the Berlin Wall was regarded as a major symbol of communist oppression.

Why did Berlin get divided?

After World War II, defeated Germany was divided into Soviet, American, British and French zones of occupation. The city of Berlin, though technically part of the Soviet zone, was also split, with the Soviets taking the eastern part of the city.

Why did East Germany fall?

Historian Frank Bösch says economic hardship was one of the main reasons for the collapse of the East German dictatorship. As an example, Bösch, who is director of the Leibniz Center for Contemporary History Potsdam (ZZF), points to the large amount of debt the GDR had amassed with Western countries.

Is any part of the Berlin Wall still standing?

Today, the Berlin Wall still stands as a monument in some parts of the city. Thirty years after its fall, the wall serves as an ever-present reminder of Berlin’s turbulent past, but also its triumphant recovery.

What country built the Berlin Wall?

On August 13, 1961, the Communist government of the German Democratic Republic (GDR, or East Germany) began to build a barbed wire and concrete “Antifascistischer Schutzwall,” or “antifascist bulwark,” between East and West Berlin.

What countries were involved in Berlin Wall?

  • The Berlin Wall (German: Berliner Mauer) was a wall that separated the city of Berlin in Germany from 1961 to 1989. …
  • After World War II ended, Germany was divided into four zones, one zone for each of the main Allied countries: France, the United Kingdom, the United States and the Soviet Union.

Why Germany was divided?

At the end of the Second World War, Germany was divided into four zones of occupation under the control of the United States, Britain, France and the Soviet Union. … Germany became a focus of Cold War politics and as divisions between East and West became more pronounced, so too did the division of Germany.

Why was Berlin divided if it was in East Germany?

The German capital, Berlin, was also divided into four zones. In 1948, three years after WWII ended, the Western Allies believed that it was time to make Germany an independent nation once more, free of foreign occupation. However, Stalin opposed this and wanted to keep the eastern part of Germany under Soviet control.

Who was East Berlin controlled by?

The Soviet Union occupied East Germany and installed a rigidly controlled communist state. The other three Allies shared the occupation of West Germany and helped rebuild the country as a capitalist democracy.

How did Germany split into East and West?

The Potsdam Agreement was made between the major winners of World War II (US, UK, and USSR) on 1 August 1945, in which Germany was separated into spheres of influence during the Cold War between the Western Bloc and Eastern Bloc. … Their German populations were expelled to the West.

How many people died trying to cross the Berlin Wall?

At the Berlin Wall alone, at least 140 people were killed or died in other ways directly connected to the GDR border regime between 1961 and 1989, including 100 people who were shot, accidentally killed, or killed themselves when they were caught trying to make it over the Wall; 30 people from both East and West who …

What was Berlin like after ww2?

Large parts of the city are in ruins . After the war ends on 8 May 1945, much of Berlin is nothing but rubble: 600,000 apartments have been destroyed, and only 2.8 million of the city’s original population of 4.3 million still live in the city.

Why did Russia build the Berlin Wall?

The Wall was built in 1961 to prevent East Germans from fleeing and stop an economically disastrous migration of workers. It was a symbol of the Cold War, and its fall in 1989 marked the approaching end of the war.

Is Checkpoint Charlie still there?

Checkpoint Charlie became a symbol of the Cold War, representing the separation of East and West. … After the dissolution of the Eastern Bloc and the reunification of Germany, the building at Checkpoint Charlie became a tourist attraction. It is now located in the Allied Museum in the Dahlem neighborhood of Berlin.

Why is it called Checkpoint Charlie?

Where did Checkpoint Charlie get its name? The name Checkpoint Charlie comes from the NATO phonetic alphabet (Alpha, Bravo, Charlie). After the border crossings at Helmstedt-Marienborn (Alpha) and Dreilinden-Drewitz (Bravo), Checkpoint Charlie was the third checkpoint opened by the Allies in and around Berlin.

Is the Berlin Wall still up 2021?

The Berlin Wall has all but disappeared from the cityscape, yet remnants of the border fortifications still remain at Bernauer Straße. The Memorial commemorates the time of Berlin’s division into East and West.

Who controlled East Germany after ww2?

After the Potsdam conference, Germany was divided into four occupied zones: Great Britain in the northwest, France in the southwest, the United States in the south and the Soviet Union in the east.

Why did people leave East Germany for the West?

Escapees had various motives for attempting to flee East Germany. The vast majority had an essentially economic motive: they wished to improve their living conditions and opportunities in the West. Some fled for political reasons, but many were impelled to leave by specific social and political events.

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